RoboAssist 2013 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 3
Title:

A Double-differential Actuation for an Assistive Hip Orthosis - Specificities and Implementation

Authors:

Jeremy Olivier, Mohamed Bouri and Hannes Bleuler

Abstract: The population ageing implies an increasing need for support especially in terms of mobility. Actuated orthoses offer new possibilities to assist walking by compensating the diminished muscular force which occurs with age. In order to assist efficiently the user, the orthotic device needs to provide torque without constraining the voluntary movements. Transparency is therefore a critical characteristic. A first implementation of such a device using a conventional actuation is presented and its limitations are analyzed. The walking trajectory being a cyclic movement, the actuator often needs to accelerate and decelerate. Its dynamics is therefore crucial and can be problematic at the higher cadences. Dual-differential actuation is therefore presented as a profitable alternative to overcome these weaknesses.

Paper Nr: 6
Title:

Feasibility of Hybrid Gait Training with Kinesis Overground Robot for Persons with incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

Authors:

Antonio J. del-Ama, Ángel Gil-Agudo, José L. Pons and Juan C. Moreno

Abstract: Hybrid actuation and control have a considerable potential for walking rehabilitation but there is a need of novel hybrid control strategies that adequately manage the balance between FES and robotic controllers. A hybrid co-operative control strategy for overground gait training with a wearable robotic exoskeleton for persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The feasibility of the control strategy to overcome muscular stimulation electro-mechanical delay, deterioration of muscle performance over time, and to balance muscular and robotic actuation cyclic overground walking is tested in one subject with incomplete spinal cord injury (L4, ASIA grade D). The results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid cooperative control in Kinesis overground robot is able to autonomously compensate a bilateral pathologic walking pattern and the suitability of Kinesis hybrid gait training robot for conducting clinical experimentation.

Paper Nr: 8
Title:

A Light-weight Exoskeleton for Hip Flexion-extension Assistance

Authors:

Francesco Giovacchini, Matteo Fantozzi, Mariele Peroni, Matteo Moisè, Marco Cempini, Mario Cortese, Dirk Lefeber, Maria Chiara Carrozza and Nicola Vitiello

Abstract: Wearable robots can represent a way to rehabilitate and/or assist people affected by gait disorders that are common problems associated with ageing, following orthopedic surgery or diseases like brain injuries. In order to improve their usability and effectiveness, exoskeletons aiming at assisting people affected by gait impairments should be light-weight devices and have safe and low output impedance actuators. In this paper we present a light-weight exoskeleton endowed with two series elastic actuators for hip flexion-extension assistance.

Paper Nr: 9
Title:

Human Motion Assistance using Walking-aid Robot and Wearable Sensors

Authors:

Jian Huang, Wenxia Xu, Zhen Shu and Samer Mohammed

Abstract: An omni-directional walking-aid robot is developed for the elderly in this study. A motion control strategy of walking-aid robot based on observing human status by wearable sensors is proposed. During normal walking, the robot is controlled by a conventional admittance control scheme. When the tendency of a fall is detected, the robot will immediately react to prevent the user from falling down. The distance between the human Centre of Pressure (COP) and the midpoint of two human feet is assumed to be a significant feature to detecting the fall events. Dubois possibility theory is applied to describe the membership function of ‘normal walking’ state. A threshold based fall detection approach is obtained from online evaluation of the walking status. Finally, experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed strategy.

Paper Nr: 12
Title:

Human-based Lower Limb Movement Assistance and Rehabilitation through an Actuated Orthosis

Authors:

Samer Mohammed, Hala Rifai, Walid Hassani and Yacine Amirat

Abstract: In this paper, an overview of the project EICOSI (Exoskeleton Intelligently COmmunicating and Sensitive to Intention) conducted at the LISSI/UPEC Lab will be presented. This work aims to control a knee joint actuated orthosis while tracking a desired trajectory or following the wearer’s intention. The proposed control strategies ensure satisfactory performances in terms of trajectory tracking, intention detection and torque generation during rehabilitation tasks and assistive movements of the wearer’s lower limbs.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 4
Title:

Humanoids Meet Rehabilitation - Concept and Potential

Authors:

Diego Torricelli and Jose L. Pons

Abstract: The development of humanoids is receiving attention in the bioengineering and health care communities, due to the high potential of bio-inspired robotics to serve as test bed of motor control theories. To this aim, Neurorobotics is gaining relevance as a way to translate the biological principles into “intelligent” machines. The result of this process is twofold: i) validating the biomechanical and neural control principles found in humans, and ii) developing more effective rehabilitation devices and strategies. In this paper, some of the main challenges of this process will be presented, with particular emphasis on the implications in diagnostic and rehabilitation of walking. As a first step in this direction, the European project H2R aims at developing a humanoid that includes the most relevant biological principles of human locomotion and posture. This new neurorobot is expected to result in a versatile test bed of future neurorehabilitation solutions.

Paper Nr: 7
Title:

Real-time Classification of Finger Movements using Two-channel Surface Electromyography

Authors:

Khairul Anam and Adel Al-Jumaily

Abstract: The use of a small number of Electromyography (EMG) channels for classifying the finger movement is a challenging task. This paper proposes the recognition system for decoding the individual and combined finger movements using two channels surface EMG. The proposed system utilizes Spectral Regression Discriminant Analysis (SRDA) for dimensionality reduction, Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) for classification and the majority vote for the classification smoothness. The experimental results show that the proposed system was able to classify ten classes of individual and combined finger movements, offline and online with accuracy 97.96 % and 97.07% respectively.

Paper Nr: 10
Title:

Evaluation of Motion Controlled Arm Support

Authors:

A. Bergsma, L. A. van der Heide, J. M. N. Essers, A. Murgia, D. van der Pijl, E. C. Cup, G. J. Gelderblom, P. H. Verstegen, I. J. M. de Groot and K. Meijer

Abstract: Many attempts have been made to help people with upper extremity limitations in daily life by means of dynamic arm supports. The effect of support on human arm movements needs to be investigated to understand how support can be optimized. The effect of gravitational pull of arm support systems with braces has been studied, it is however still unclear how joint moments are affected in people suffering from for example neuromuscular diseases and how people perform with an arm support in a daily life situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of arm support systems on the arm function and use in daily life. This was realized by studying the effect of an available support system on the arm function at various levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). A test battery has been developed that combines questionnaires and ordinal clinical scales, with quantitative measures such as 3D motion analysis and EMG to provide a more complete picture of the compensatory movement patterns used by patients with proximal muscle weakness of the upper extremities in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Moreover, biomechanical models and inverse dynamic software were used to calculate the shoulder and elbow joint moments in different conditions. These measures were used to investigate movement capacities of people with various neuromuscular disorders. To evaluate the performance in daily life, an measurement protocol has been developed to measure how people use the arms and the arm support during daily activities. The current study presents some preliminary results of initial evaluation measures. The goals of these evaluations are multiple: to see if design goals and specifications are met, to gain first outcomes on usage and usability of the new device, and compare functionality with high- end existing devices of this class. The availability of such a set will be applicable for evaluation of support systems.

Paper Nr: 11
Title:

Ankle-Knee Prosthesis with Powered Ankle and Energy Transfer - Development of the CYBERLEGs Alpha-Prototype

Authors:

Louis Flynn, Joost Geeroms, Rene Jimenez-Fabian, Bram Vanderborght, Nicola Vitiello and Dirk Lefeber

Abstract: Active prostheses have recently come onto the market, but are limited to modular forms without connections between the knee and ankle modules. Here we present the simulation, design, and preliminary data of a new knee-ankle prosthesis with an actuated ankle based on a variable stiffness actuator with energy transfer from the knee to the ankle as a part of the CYBERLEGs FP7-ICT project. The CYBERLEGs a-Prosthesis utilizes a novel active ankle joint architecture and energy transfer mechanism to transfer energy from the knee joint to the ankle. The device is capable of producing a level ground walking gait that closely approximates the joint torques and kinematics of a non-amputee while while maintaining compliant joints, which has the potential to decrease impulse losses, and ultimately reduce the end user energy consumption. This first prototype consists of a passive knee and an active ankle, which are energetically coupled to reduce the total power consumption of the device.

Paper Nr: 13
Title:

It is (almost) All about Human Safety - A Novel Paradigm for Robot Design, Control, and Planning

Authors:

Sami Haddadin

Abstract: For understanding the risks of this undertaking we performed a series of safety investigations, which led to fundamental insight into the potential injury a human would suffer due to a collision with a robot. Furthermore, we developed human-friendly interaction control and motion schemes that enable the robot to show sophisticated real-time responses on interaction force level, motion planning, and real-time task planning. Generally, our approach of embodying reactivity on all levels of robot design and control is to our understanding the core to safe acting and manipulation in human environments. Consequently, the careful design and selection of methods that satisfy this requirement was our main premise.