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Keynote Lectures

The Digital Accessibility from the User Point of View
Julio Abascal, University of the Basque Country/Euskal Herriko Uniberstitatea, Spain

The Role of Physiological Data in Neurorehabilitation
Eduardo Rocon, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Spain

 

The Digital Accessibility from the User Point of View

Julio Abascal
University of the Basque Country/Euskal Herriko Uniberstitatea
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Julio Abascal is a Professor of the Computer Architecture and Technology Department of the UPV/EHU since 1981. In 1985 he co-founded the EGOKITUZ Laboratory of HCI for Special Needs. His research activity is focused on the application of HCI methods and techniques to the Assistive Technology, including the design of ubiquitous, adaptive and accessible user interfaces. He is the Spanish representative in the IFIP TC 13 on HCI from 1991, and the former and founder chairman (in 1993) of IFIP WG 13.3 “HCI and Disability”.


Abstract
From its foundation in 1985, the Egokituz Laboratory of HCI for Special Needs has researched the application of diverse HCI methodologies and technologies to enhance the inclusion and digital accessibility of people with diverse types of disabilities. Along this time we discovered that the human side of the HCI requires specific attention that technology oriented people -we- are not always qualified to pay. In this talk I will review some mistakes that lead us to learn it and our approaches to overcome them.



 

 

The Role of Physiological Data in Neurorehabilitation

Eduardo Rocon
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Eduardo Rocon was born in Vitoria, Brazil (1979). He graduated in Electrical Engineering at Universidade Federal do Espiríto Santo (UFES) in 2001. Subsequently he moved to Spain to pursue a Ph.D. degree in Industrial Engineering at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid with Prof. A. Barrientos and Prof. J.L. Pons. His Ph.D. thesis (2006), for which he was awarded the Georges Giralt PhD Award (2008), focused on the development of a rehabilitation robotic exoskeleton that provides a means of testing and validating non grounded control strategies for robotic exoskeletons for active upper limb tremor suppression. Dr. Rocon continued his work in tremor suppression and the application of neuroprosthetics and neurorobotics in rehabilitation on a post-doctoral contract from 2006 to 2009. In 2009, Dr. Rocon was awarded with a Ramón y Cajal contract to continue developing his activities (the most competitive and prestigious postdoc contract in Spain). At the age of 30, Dr. Rocon got a tenured researcher position (2010-present) at CSIC. His career has recently been awarded the prestigious Juan Lopez de Peñalver Award of the Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering. Dr. Rocon’s multidisciplinary work has contributed to different aspects of robotics, neuroscience and medicine. Dr. Rocon research activities have generated more than 150 publications scientific publication, 1 book, 9 book chapters, and 7 patents.


Abstract
This talk will introduce our research activity focused on the development of technologies to understand, monitor and restore human motor control. As part of these activities, we have expanded our research from pure robotics to the emerging field of neural engineering, adopting emerging technologies and drawing a stronger inspiration from neuroscience. In this field, the symbiotic relationship between humans and robots transcends the boundaries of simple physical interaction. It involves smart sensors, actuators, algorithms and control strategies capable of gathering and decoding complex human expressions or physiological phenomena. Once this process is complete, robots use the information to adapt, learn and optimize their functions, or even to transmit back a response resulting from a cognitive process occurring within the robot. In order to develop such interfaces, we have been developing interfaces based on physiological data in its different dimensions, either bioelectrical, biomechanical, biochemical or biophysical, in order to assess the generation, transmission and execution of motions. Our hypothesis is that this approach will improve neurophysiologic knowledge of human motor control and enable the development of cognitive interfaces more robust and functional. The contribution to these research lines will be illustrated by our developments in particular scenarios: development of a robotic solutions for tremor suppression and rehabilitation of people with mobility impairments, and the development of robotic, interfaces and serious games for the rehabilitation of children with Cerebral Palsy. 



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